CG Sculpture and Jewelry

classes/lectures

The making of Lady Liberty (and how you can too!)

inspirations, for fun, classes/lecturesCatherine Grisez3 Comments

This summer I had the good fortune to visit my niece in New York City. Along with my mom and sisters, we got to see her awash in the fun exciting energy of the city, following her journalism dreams as she interned at NBC Nightly news. Normally when I visit the big apple I stick to galleries and general nyc mayhem, but this time around we hit some iconic staples- Rockefeller, 9/11 memorial, Ellis Island, and of course the Statue of Liberty.

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Part of the reason Lady Liberty was such a highlight for me (in addition to having a great reminder of America as a welcoming country) is because the process used to make her - repousse hammer forming - is one I frequently use in my sculptural work. Repousse is the art of hammering metal from the inside (or back) to create a form. It is often paired with chasing, which is hammering from the outside (or front) of the form.

I thought I'd share some images from the museum for those who are curious how she's made...

 This is a plaster model of her toes. Since the statue is recreating an immense figure, models were used to ensure accuracy of scale. It's also a better way to make the parts since everything is so huge.

This is a plaster model of her toes. Since the statue is recreating an immense figure, models were used to ensure accuracy of scale. It's also a better way to make the parts since everything is so huge.

 Here's the big toe being formed in a wood mold made from the plaster model above. In the small metals world, we often skip the model and use pitch or wax for this purpose, or even sometimes hammering on air. Since I'm often working with abstract imagery, I can form over a variety of steel stakes, sand bags, and hammers to get the shapes I want.

Here's the big toe being formed in a wood mold made from the plaster model above. In the small metals world, we often skip the model and use pitch or wax for this purpose, or even sometimes hammering on air. Since I'm often working with abstract imagery, I can form over a variety of steel stakes, sand bags, and hammers to get the shapes I want.

 The same toe after hammering is completed with reinforcement bars on the interior. This metal is about 1/8" thick - thin in terms of a large scale statue (hence support bars), but quite thick in terms of small scale metalforming. I usually use metal sheet that is about less than half this thickness. Also, notice the tool to the left called a mushroom stake, one of the tools we use frequently in the holloware/metalsmithing world. It's most often used to smooth out forms from the outside that have been roughly shaped from the inside.

The same toe after hammering is completed with reinforcement bars on the interior. This metal is about 1/8" thick - thin in terms of a large scale statue (hence support bars), but quite thick in terms of small scale metalforming. I usually use metal sheet that is about less than half this thickness. Also, notice the tool to the left called a mushroom stake, one of the tools we use frequently in the holloware/metalsmithing world. It's most often used to smooth out forms from the outside that have been roughly shaped from the inside.

 And voila - the finished toe as seen from the outside. Notice the rivets on the toenail - that's where it's attached to the reinforcement bar as seen in the previous picture.

And voila - the finished toe as seen from the outside. Notice the rivets on the toenail - that's where it's attached to the reinforcement bar as seen in the previous picture.

 You can get a better idea of the scale here with my sisters snazzy sneaker rubbing toes.

You can get a better idea of the scale here with my sisters snazzy sneaker rubbing toes.

 A replica of her face. At more than 8' tall this is copper forming at a most impressive scale.

A replica of her face. At more than 8' tall this is copper forming at a most impressive scale.

 Notice the seem on her nose. Smaller forms were joined together to create one solid shape. To join pieces of metal, In some cases they are riveted to each other or reinforcement bars and in others welded or soldered. Here you can see the soldered zipper seam, a process I've used on larger seamed vessels and one I've taught during holloware classes. Rather than using a butt seam, a zipper seam can handle much more distress during the hammering process.

Notice the seem on her nose. Smaller forms were joined together to create one solid shape. To join pieces of metal, In some cases they are riveted to each other or reinforcement bars and in others welded or soldered. Here you can see the soldered zipper seam, a process I've used on larger seamed vessels and one I've taught during holloware classes. Rather than using a butt seam, a zipper seam can handle much more distress during the hammering process.

 This view shows the interior structure and stairwell up to the crown. Sadly reservations to walk up were sold out but I was able to get this peak into the inside. To the right you can see the interior of the copper with the reinforcement bars that support the form and hold things together.

This view shows the interior structure and stairwell up to the crown. Sadly reservations to walk up were sold out but I was able to get this peak into the inside. To the right you can see the interior of the copper with the reinforcement bars that support the form and hold things together.

There you have it! Pretty amazing for those of us who geek out on metalsmithing. For those of you who want first hand experience with this process, the next workshop I'm teaching is right up your alley. October 7-8 at Pratt Fine Arts in Seattle, I'll be teaching a Metal masks class where we'll be hammering copper sheet much like you see here (only thinner metal and smaller pieces!)

 A few sample copper masks for the workshop. Come hammer with us! Perhaps a Lady Liberty mask is in your future?

A few sample copper masks for the workshop. Come hammer with us! Perhaps a Lady Liberty mask is in your future?

Part You is up to 200!

classes/lectures, for funCatherine GrisezComment

It's been great fun working with many of you to create the growing leaf pile for Part You! We've got 200 leaves ready to go so far. Bellevue Art Museum, Pratt Fine Arts, South Park Arts, Tin Dog Brewing, and Seattle Office of Art and Culture have all been fantastic sponsors - looking forward to more! Next event is October 27th at Pratt from 6-9:30pm. Stay tuned for more details...

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Saturday - leaf making events

for fun, classes/lecturesCatherine GrisezComment
 Part You -  a collaboration between artist and community, encouraging all to break from routine, use your hands to create, and raise money for others to do the same in the process

Part You - a collaboration between artist and community, encouraging all to break from routine, use your hands to create, and raise money for others to do the same in the process

Be a part of something bigger than yourself -- join me in the making of an interactive art piece. Learn to press, hammer and form copper foil into 3-dimensional leaf shapes to create components for a sculpture. Together we will create a giant exploding leaf pile, reminiscent of one you’d jump in as a kid when a sense of wonder was more easily found in simple pleasures. You’ll be able to see your handiwork installed in a show at Traver Gallery January-February of 2017.

Once complete, the sculpture will be donated to the annual Pratt art auction to raise money for art classes for under-served teens.

Saturday, September 22nd

South Park Library, 10th Anniversary Party - 12:30-2:00pm     8604 8th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108

Pratt Fine Art Center, Fall Open House - 6-9:00pm    1902 S Main St, Seattle, WA 98144

1mm - 50'

classes/lecturesCatherine GrisezComment
 Cultivate

Cultivate

I'll be giving a talk about my work next week, spanning 2 decades and work ranging in scale from tiny jewelry to large sculpture, or in some cases, tiny sculptures and large jewelry. Hope you can join me!

Thursday, May 12th
7-8:30pm

Seattle Pacific University
3469 Third Avenue West
Otto Miller Hall Room 109

Doors open at 6:30. Lectures begin at 7:00.
Presented by the Seattle Metals Guild.
Guild Members: Free
Non-Members: $5 Suggested Donation